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A Bird’s Eye View of Recovery among Latinx Populations in the US

November 24 @ 5:30 pm - 7:30 pm

The Recovery Services and Harm Reduction Lecture Series

Presented by RICARES, the COBRE Center on Opioids and Overdose, and Brown University School of Public Health; featuring Dr. Miguel Pinedo. More information here

About this Event

Latinos are disproportionally impacted by alcohol and drug-related problems relative to other racial/ethnic groups. Despite their high need for treatment, Latinos are less likely to use treatment services, or to complete such treatment, than other racial/ethnic groups. In general, barriers related to access and cost (e.g., having treatment covered by insurance, being employed, income, transportation issues) do not explain racial/ethnic disparities in treatment utilization.

This talk will focus on novel mixed methods research that underscores the role of attitudinal factors (e.g., low perceived treatment need, low problem recognition), cultural factors (e.g., treatment providers’ lack of awareness of Latino culture), and immigration-related factors (e.g., fear of deportation) in shaping the help seeking behaviors of Latinos.

About Dr. Pinedo

Dr. Pinedo has an invested interest in better understanding the intersection between migration and health. Though migrant health has become an important facet of health research, migration has rarely been examined as a social determinant of health. His work addresses this critical area by focusing on how different migration experiences contribute to health disparities, particularly among Latino populations. Specifically, his work investigates how social- and structural-level factors associated with migration to the US; voluntary and forced migration (e.g., deportation); domestic migration within Mexico; and migration to high-risk environments (e.g., settings with increased availability of alcohol and drugs) relate to the epidemiology of substance abuse, HIV risk, and related harms. A large proportion of his work has focused on Mexican migrants residing on both sides of the US-Mexico border, a high-risk region for alcohol and drug abuse and HIV. Overall, his research underscores the importance of migration-related factors in shaping health behaviors, risk practices, and health outcomes.

Register here

Details

Date:
November 24
Time:
5:30 pm - 7:30 pm
Event Categories:
,

Details

Date:
November 24
Time:
5:30 pm - 7:30 pm
Event Categories:
,